Saturday, 19 May 2018

The Role of Pet Rehabilitation Therapy in Veterinary Care

Pet Rehabilitation therapy is important to your pet's health and recoveryMany people seek out the care of physical therapists throughout their lifetime. Whether it be for a bad back, strengthening a limb after surgery, or regaining function after an injury, physical therapy plays a huge role in helping us stay healthy, active, and comfortable.

Animals are no different. Pet rehabilitation therapy is fast becoming a cornerstone of veterinary care. Godspeed Animal Care knows how important it is to provide the very best for our furry patients, which is why we offer pet rehabilitation therapy services for animals in the Williamsburg, Virginia area.

Pet Rehabilitation Therapy Basics

Much like physical therapy in people, pet rehabilitation therapy focuses on the relationships between muscles, bones, nerves, tendons, and ligaments in order to decrease pain and improve function.

Some veterinarians, such as our very own Dr. Pamela Dumont, have undergone additional training in order to receive certification in veterinary rehabilitation therapy. This certification requires many hours of studying and hands-on experience to be better able to help our pet patients.

Pets being seen through our rehabilitation services are assessed individually and a treatment plan is designed based on the patient’s needs. Most patients can benefit from a multi-faceted approach, incorporating therapies, such as:

  • Massage
  • Passive range of motion and stretching exercises
  • Therapeutic laser sessions
  • Therapeutic exercise programs
  • Underwater treadmill sessions

These techniques, when utilized correctly, can help pets with a wide array of problems and needs. In particular, animals with decreased function and pain related to osteoarthritis and aging can benefit, as well as those recovering from an injury or surgery.

Rehab by Sea

While rehabilitation therapy typically relies on utilizing several techniques to produce the best outcome for our patients, we are particularly proud of our underwater treadmill.

Also known as hydro-treadmill therapy, an underwater treadmill is a valuable tool that has a myriad of uses. These might include:

  • Helping to increase strength and function after injury or surgery
  • Encouraging neurologic function
  • Promoting weight bearing
  • Conditioning athletes  
  • Weight management
  • Improving function in geriatric pets

Underwater treadmill therapy achieves its benefits due to the ability to exploit the buoyancy or resistance of water, depending on the goals for a patient. The warm water is also invaluable for muscle relaxation, tendon stretching, and improving edema or swelling.

An underwater treadmill allows the patient to maintain the the normal gait during the session, as opposed to actual swimming, which exercises different muscles. Most patients seem to enjoy the sessions, especially when we utilize favorite treats or toys for motivation.

Speed, water height, turbulence, and water temperature can all be controlled, making underwater treadmill therapy very customizable. We can find a way to use it to help almost any patient.

Pet rehabilitation therapy is an important part of pet care for so many of our patients. If you think that your four-legged friend could benefit, please feel free to contact us for more information. We love to help animals feel better and are happy to assist you in any way possible.

The post The Role of Pet Rehabilitation Therapy in Veterinary Care appeared first on Godspeed Animal Care.


The Role of Pet Rehabilitation Therapy in Veterinary Care posted first on http://furryfiesta.blogspot.com

Thursday, 17 May 2018

The Role of Pet Rehabilitation Therapy in Veterinary Care

Pet Rehabilitation therapy is important to your pet's health and recoveryMany people seek out the care of physical therapists throughout their lifetime. Whether it be for a bad back, strengthening a limb after surgery, or regaining function after an injury, physical therapy plays a huge role in helping us stay healthy, active, and comfortable.

Animals are no different. Pet rehabilitation therapy is fast becoming a cornerstone of veterinary care. Godspeed Animal Care knows how important it is to provide the very best for our furry patients, which is why we offer pet rehabilitation therapy services for animals in the Williamsburg, Virginia area.

Pet Rehabilitation Therapy Basics

Much like physical therapy in people, pet rehabilitation therapy focuses on the relationships between muscles, bones, nerves, tendons, and ligaments in order to decrease pain and improve function.

Some veterinarians, such as our very own Dr. Pamela Dumont, have undergone additional training in order to receive certification in veterinary rehabilitation therapy. This certification requires many hours of studying and hands-on experience to be better able to help our pet patients.

Pets being seen through our rehabilitation services are assessed individually and a treatment plan is designed based on the patient’s needs. Most patients can benefit from a multi-faceted approach, incorporating therapies, such as:

  • Massage
  • Passive range of motion and stretching exercises
  • Therapeutic laser sessions
  • Therapeutic exercise programs
  • Underwater treadmill sessions

These techniques, when utilized correctly, can help pets with a wide array of problems and needs. In particular, animals with decreased function and pain related to osteoarthritis and aging can benefit, as well as those recovering from an injury or surgery.

Rehab by Sea

While rehabilitation therapy typically relies on utilizing several techniques to produce the best outcome for our patients, we are particularly proud of our underwater treadmill.

Also known as hydro-treadmill therapy, an underwater treadmill is a valuable tool that has a myriad of uses. These might include:

  • Helping to increase strength and function after injury or surgery
  • Encouraging neurologic function
  • Promoting weight bearing
  • Conditioning athletes  
  • Weight management
  • Improving function in geriatric pets

Underwater treadmill therapy achieves its benefits due to the ability to exploit the buoyancy or resistance of water, depending on the goals for a patient. The warm water is also invaluable for muscle relaxation, tendon stretching, and improving edema or swelling.

An underwater treadmill allows the patient to maintain the the normal gait during the session, as opposed to actual swimming, which exercises different muscles. Most patients seem to enjoy the sessions, especially when we utilize favorite treats or toys for motivation.

Speed, water height, turbulence, and water temperature can all be controlled, making underwater treadmill therapy very customizable. We can find a way to use it to help almost any patient.

Pet rehabilitation therapy is an important part of pet care for so many of our patients. If you think that your four-legged friend could benefit, please feel free to contact us for more information. We love to help animals feel better and are happy to assist you in any way possible.

The post The Role of Pet Rehabilitation Therapy in Veterinary Care appeared first on Godspeed Animal Care.


The Role of Pet Rehabilitation Therapy in Veterinary Care posted first on http://furryfiesta.blogspot.com

Sunday, 22 April 2018

Slow and Steady: Caring for Your Pet After Surgery

post surgery pet careSome pet owners are given ample time to prepare for their pet’s upcoming surgery, as in the case of a scheduled spay or neuter procedure. Pet owners coping with an emergency illness or injury don’t have time to consider all the in’s and out’s of prepping. However, what is possibly more important is taking care of a pet after surgery. Post-operative care can be a cause for concern, but with the right information your pet can get through it with flying colors.

Straightforward and Simple

Recovering from a routine surgery can be quite simple, but it’s not always without certain challenges. The day of and after surgery, pets are typically groggy, tired, and nauseous. Special handling and consideration are absolutely required for these two days.

Once the effects of the anesthesia fully wear off, you’ll see less sleepiness and more control of motor functions and balance. However, your pet must be discouraged from running, jumping, and roughhousing. A cone, or Elizabethan collar, may be necessary for up to two weeks, to keep them from licking or biting at their sutures.

Post-Op Tactics

You will be sent home with specific instructions about caring for your pet after surgery, but the following general guidelines apply:

  • Anesthesia will inhibit their ability to regulate body temperature. Keeping your pet warm after surgery is important, but they shouldn’t be allowed to overheat.
  • Because of their semi-wobbly state, you may decide to keep them as comfortable as possible on the floor. Set up a nice bed with cushions, blankets, and pillows. Clear away any potential obstacles, in case they need to get up or go outside to eliminate.
  • Due to the intravenous fluids they received during the procedure, your pet will need regular bathroom breaks. Depending on their needs or abilities, they may need to be carried outside or walked on leash, even if it’s a fenced-in yard. Your pet probably won’t feel thirsty, but they should have access to clean, fresh water (and constant reminders to drink). Be prepared to deal with accidents.
  • For at least the first full day afterwards, limit food portions to minimize tummy troubles or vomiting.
  • Keep a close eye on the wound, dressing it as necessary. Typically, sutures simply need to just stay dry in order to heal faster. If you are given any medications, use as directed.
  • Please do not hesitate to contact us regarding drainage, discharge, or bleeding.
  • Take your pet on short walks 1-2 times a day, but watch for any signs of exhaustion or overexertion.
  • Try to keep them isolated from kids and other pets for a few days, if possible.

Normal Pet After Surgery

It’s common to see pets bounce back from surgery within a few days, and be back to their normal selves in short order. If you have any concerns about your pet’s behavior or recovery time, we are always here to help you. Hopefully, with a few great snuggle sessions, some great food, and fresh air, your pet will be back in action in no time at all.

The post Slow and Steady: Caring for Your Pet After Surgery appeared first on Godspeed Animal Care.


Slow and Steady: Caring for Your Pet After Surgery posted first on http://furryfiesta.blogspot.com

Saturday, 21 April 2018

Slow and Steady: Caring for Your Pet After Surgery

post surgery pet careSome pet owners are given ample time to prepare for their pet’s upcoming surgery, as in the case of a scheduled spay or neuter procedure. Pet owners coping with an emergency illness or injury don’t have time to consider all the in’s and out’s of prepping. However, what is possibly more important is taking care of a pet after surgery. Post-operative care can be a cause for concern, but with the right information your pet can get through it with flying colors.

Straightforward and Simple

Recovering from a routine surgery can be quite simple, but it’s not always without certain challenges. The day of and after surgery, pets are typically groggy, tired, and nauseous. Special handling and consideration are absolutely required for these two days.

Once the effects of the anesthesia fully wear off, you’ll see less sleepiness and more control of motor functions and balance. However, your pet must be discouraged from running, jumping, and roughhousing. A cone, or Elizabethan collar, may be necessary for up to two weeks, to keep them from licking or biting at their sutures.

Post-Op Tactics

You will be sent home with specific instructions about caring for your pet after surgery, but the following general guidelines apply:

  • Anesthesia will inhibit their ability to regulate body temperature. Keeping your pet warm after surgery is important, but they shouldn’t be allowed to overheat.
  • Because of their semi-wobbly state, you may decide to keep them as comfortable as possible on the floor. Set up a nice bed with cushions, blankets, and pillows. Clear away any potential obstacles, in case they need to get up or go outside to eliminate.
  • Due to the intravenous fluids they received during the procedure, your pet will need regular bathroom breaks. Depending on their needs or abilities, they may need to be carried outside or walked on leash, even if it’s a fenced-in yard. Your pet probably won’t feel thirsty, but they should have access to clean, fresh water (and constant reminders to drink). Be prepared to deal with accidents.
  • For at least the first full day afterwards, limit food portions to minimize tummy troubles or vomiting.
  • Keep a close eye on the wound, dressing it as necessary. Typically, sutures simply need to just stay dry in order to heal faster. If you are given any medications, use as directed.
  • Please do not hesitate to contact us regarding drainage, discharge, or bleeding.
  • Take your pet on short walks 1-2 times a day, but watch for any signs of exhaustion or overexertion.
  • Try to keep them isolated from kids and other pets for a few days, if possible.

Normal Pet After Surgery

It’s common to see pets bounce back from surgery within a few days, and be back to their normal selves in short order. If you have any concerns about your pet’s behavior or recovery time, we are always here to help you. Hopefully, with a few great snuggle sessions, some great food, and fresh air, your pet will be back in action in no time at all.

The post Slow and Steady: Caring for Your Pet After Surgery appeared first on Godspeed Animal Care.


Slow and Steady: Caring for Your Pet After Surgery posted first on http://furryfiesta.blogspot.com

Wednesday, 18 April 2018

Slow and Steady: Caring for Your Pet After Surgery

post surgery pet careSome pet owners are given ample time to prepare for their pet’s upcoming surgery, as in the case of a scheduled spay or neuter procedure. Pet owners coping with an emergency illness or injury don’t have time to consider all the in’s and out’s of prepping. However, what is possibly more important is taking care of a pet after surgery. Post-operative care can be a cause for concern, but with the right information your pet can get through it with flying colors.

Straightforward and Simple

Recovering from a routine surgery can be quite simple, but it’s not always without certain challenges. The day of and after surgery, pets are typically groggy, tired, and nauseous. Special handling and consideration are absolutely required for these two days.

Once the effects of the anesthesia fully wear off, you’ll see less sleepiness and more control of motor functions and balance. However, your pet must be discouraged from running, jumping, and roughhousing. A cone, or Elizabethan collar, may be necessary for up to two weeks, to keep them from licking or biting at their sutures.

Post-Op Tactics

You will be sent home with specific instructions about caring for your pet after surgery, but the following general guidelines apply:

  • Anesthesia will inhibit their ability to regulate body temperature. Keeping your pet warm after surgery is important, but they shouldn’t be allowed to overheat.
  • Because of their semi-wobbly state, you may decide to keep them as comfortable as possible on the floor. Set up a nice bed with cushions, blankets, and pillows. Clear away any potential obstacles, in case they need to get up or go outside to eliminate.
  • Due to the intravenous fluids they received during the procedure, your pet will need regular bathroom breaks. Depending on their needs or abilities, they may need to be carried outside or walked on leash, even if it’s a fenced-in yard. Your pet probably won’t feel thirsty, but they should have access to clean, fresh water (and constant reminders to drink). Be prepared to deal with accidents.
  • For at least the first full day afterwards, limit food portions to minimize tummy troubles or vomiting.
  • Keep a close eye on the wound, dressing it as necessary. Typically, sutures simply need to just stay dry in order to heal faster. If you are given any medications, use as directed.
  • Please do not hesitate to contact us regarding drainage, discharge, or bleeding.
  • Take your pet on short walks 1-2 times a day, but watch for any signs of exhaustion or overexertion.
  • Try to keep them isolated from kids and other pets for a few days, if possible.

Normal Pet After Surgery

It’s common to see pets bounce back from surgery within a few days, and be back to their normal selves in short order. If you have any concerns about your pet’s behavior or recovery time, we are always here to help you. Hopefully, with a few great snuggle sessions, some great food, and fresh air, your pet will be back in action in no time at all.

The post Slow and Steady: Caring for Your Pet After Surgery appeared first on Godspeed Animal Care.


Slow and Steady: Caring for Your Pet After Surgery posted first on http://furryfiesta.blogspot.com

Monday, 9 April 2018

Bad Breath Muffins: Natural Recipe for Dogs

Nothing prevents snuggling with our dog like bad breath (Halitosis). These homemade muffin dog treats are a specifically formulated recipe, designed to naturally freshen your dog’s breath with natural deodorizers and holistic digestive aids. Important note: Dogs with bad breath (Halitosis) are often suffering from dental issues, or foul dog breath may indicate a serious […]

The post Bad Breath Muffins: Natural Recipe for Dogs appeared first on All Natural Pet Care Blog.


Bad Breath Muffins: Natural Recipe for Dogs posted first on http://furryfiesta.blogspot.com

Tuesday, 20 March 2018

The Big Picture: How Ultrasound Technology Can Help Diagnose Your Pet

diagnose your petHave you ever been concerned about your pet not eating? Maybe she’s been vomiting for a few days, and you’re not sure why. Chances are, you brought her into the vet. Sometimes the problem is quickly pinpointed and treatment begins immediately. But what about if we can’t find what’s wrong through a physical exam, x-rays, and blood tests?

Sometimes we need to dig deeper to diagnose your pet, and this is where ultrasound comes in. Years ago, we may have had to perform exploratory surgery to get a look at internal organs. Today, we have ultrasound to help us examine internal organs in a non-invasive manner. Godspeed Animal Care is proud to offer this service to pets in our area.

What Is Ultrasound?

Ultrasound uses high frequency sound waves that bounce off internal structures in the area of interest. A probe is used on the skin of your pet over the area to be evaluated, and this returns an image of the internal structures to a screen. It is totally painless for your pet.

Using Ultrasound to Diagnose Your Pet

Ultrasound was first used in veterinary medicine to check for pregnancy. However, the technique has advanced to be useful in a number of ways, including:

Reproductive – Ultrasound is still used to evaluate pregnancy, due dates, and number of puppies or kittens to expect. It’s a fun and exciting way to make sure things are on track!

Abdominal – In evaluating the abdominal cavity with ultrasound, we can visualize the organs, such as the liver, stomach, and kidney. Ultrasound is useful in detecting tumors, cysts, and abnormalities in organs and blood vessels.

Cardiac – A cardiac ultrasound can be performed to visualize the heart and its structures, and to measure heart function. These scans are sent to a veterinary cardiac specialist for evaluation to be sure we detect any small anomaly.

Emergency – In a veterinary emergency, we can use ultrasound to quickly and painlessly evaluate what’s wrong internally and plan next steps, including surgery.

Biopsy – Sometimes it’s necessary to collect some cells from an organ or internal structure to determine what kind of disease we might be dealing with. In these instances, biopsy may be recommended. Because we can so clearly see the internal structures with ultrasound, an ultrasound guided biopsy is an advanced way to make sure we are collecting cells from a specific spot.

Cystocentesis – Just as collecting cells is made more specific with ultrasound, we can also use it to collect urine samples directly from the bladder in a pain-free manner. This ensures that if we find bacteria present, it’s in the bladder and not on the outside of the skin or other structures.

Are There Any Drawbacks to Ultrasound?

Although ultrasound is an effective tool for evaluating internal structures, ultrasound waves cannot pass through air, and so it’s not useful in evaluating the lungs. In addition, it’s not the best way to evaluate bones, as the ultrasound waves are also stopped by bone. Luckily, we have other great tools to evaluate these areas.

We hope this has given you an overview of what ultrasound is and how it can be used to diagnose your pet. If ultrasound has been recommended for your pet, or if you have additional questions, please call us for more information.

The post The Big Picture: How Ultrasound Technology Can Help Diagnose Your Pet appeared first on Godspeed Animal Care.


The Big Picture: How Ultrasound Technology Can Help Diagnose Your Pet posted first on http://furryfiesta.blogspot.com